Frozen Hash Browns Recalled Due to Possible Golf Ball Parts

We love hash browns. The one McDonald’s item that we’d pick if we could only eat one McDonald’s item for eternity? Their hash browns. Generally, we prefer our food fresh and not frozen. When it comes to hash browns, though, frozen ain’t so bad. There’s no fair way to say this, but, recently, select frozen hash browns have been recalled because they contain golf ball parts. (See what we did there? Like fairway? It’s funny, no?)

According to the FDA, “extraneous golf ball materials” may have found their way into McCain Foods USA, Inc.’s hash browns. Extraneous golf ball materials, to us, means a couple of Bud heavies and a cigar or two. In this instance, though, there may be actual chunks of golf ball mixed in with your frozen potatoes.

So what's the problem? #golfballs and #hashbrowns are a #southern #tradition. #fatskull #golf #golflife @fatskullgolf

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Roundy’s- and Harris Teeter-brand frozen hash browns may have been affected by this. Roundy’s customers in Illinois and Wisconsin may want to check their hash browns with the eyes of a seasoned caddy.

Harris Teeter hash brown lovers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, and Maryland should also be on high alert. We’re pretty sure the nation’s capitol made that list, too.

Not even the threat of eating golf balls can keep me away from hash browns. #keepinit? (link in bio)

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No injuries have been reported related to this yet. We’re still chalking it up as a double bogey, though. (In the sense that it’s bad, not in the sense that it’s a regular occurrence for you. Zing!) Why, you ask? How on Earth do you not realize that you’re harvesting golf ball shards with your potatoes?

Golf ball shards may go undetected, but shouldn’t they be separated from the whole potato at some point in the process? We hope that, moving forward, there’s an extraneous golf ball material extraction phase integrated into the frozen hash brown making process.

McCain seems to be fixing this divot, taking all of the necessary steps to remove effected products from store shelves.