A Sommelier Tastes and Ranks the Best Boxed Wines

Being a wine expert means you get to taste some of the best wines in the world, whether it be a sauvignon blanc or a pinot noir. And sometimes, it means you don’t. Award-winning wine expert Patrick Cappiello threw caution to the wind when he decided to break down the barriers of boxed wine. Wine with a spout usually gets a bad rap, and sometimes, it’s with good reason. However, is there quality wine hiding in one of those cardboard boxes?

As Cappiello explains, it’s a whole lot of wine and, for the most part, it is generally not made very well for the inexpensive wine enthusiast. Think movie theater hot dogs or gas station sushi. While the bang for your buck may be appealing, it will cost you in other ways. So he put a few of the big boys to the test. What results is a lot of giggling and a whole lot more gagging than we expected to find the best buys in boxed wine, both white wine and red wine.

While we aren’t too surprised that Franzia scored an F, it was shocking to hear that Black Box wines aren’t as good as one might assume. Sometimes, good packaging really is deceiving. Sometimes, you’re best just choosing the house wine, and sometimes that house wine is just Carlo Rossi Red Blend or cabernet sauvignon from a liquor store in California.

However, the next time you see Bandit or Bota Box, you should probably pick one up because it ranked decently and that’s all you can ask for. Easy drinking for wine lovers doesn’t have to mean expensive or fancy, some of the best and cheaper wines have a screw cap instead of a cork. These boxed wines just happen to have a spout, but that doesn’t mean Bandit or Bota isn’t the best wine for your impromptu dinner party. In fact, it just might be.

If boxed wine isn’t particularly your thing, try canned wine or one of the types of forties available in a red or rosé. You never know what you’ll find, especially when you venture into the world of wine.

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